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Mechanical Engineering. 2019;141(06):S3-S6. doi:10.1115/1.2019-JUN4.
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Since this is the last issue of the DSC magazine in its current form, this article is a chance to look back over the years and reflect on what the magazine offered over that time.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2019;141(06):S7-S11. doi:10.1115/1.2019-JUN5.
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Small rotorcraft unmanned air vehicles (sUAVs) are valuable tools in solving geospatial inspection challenges. One area where this is being widely explored is disaster reconnaissance [1]. Using sUAVs to collect images provides engineers and government officials critical information about the conditions before and after a disaster [2]. This is accomplished by creating high- fidelity 3D models from the sUAV’s imagery. However, using an sUAV to perform inspections is a challenging task due to constraints on the vehicle’s flight time, computational power, and data storage capabilities [3]. The approach presented in this article illustrates a method for utilizing multiple sUAVs to inspect a disaster region and merge the separate data into a single high-resolution 3D model.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2019;141(06):26-31. doi:10.1115/1.2019-JUN1.
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Traditional generating stations that produce baseload power measured in hundreds of megawatts are either closing or struggling, unable to compete with inexpensive power produced by solar, wind, or natural gas-burning plants. To handle these multitude of distributed, small-bore sources, a new smart grid is developing, where small buyers and sellers of electricity may find a marketplace. But for that to break into the mainstream, a new system linking disparate generators, buyers, and sellers with fast and secure transactions still needs development. Many industry experts suggest that this new system could well be based on blockchain, a digital technology commonly associated with cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin. This article takes a closer look at a few pilot projects moving in various market segments.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2019;141(06):32-37. doi:10.1115/1.2019-JUN3.
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Electric and autonomous vehicles will change the layout and rhythm of our lives. Entwined with this story of change are the fuels and forms of energy we used to enable the engines and motors to propel us forward. In this excerpt from his upcoming book, noted energy expert Michael Webber makes the case that switching from oil to electricity for powering vehicles would cut transportation-related carbon emissions and create a pathway to quieter, zippier travel.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2019;141(06):38-43. doi:10.1115/1.2019-JUN2.
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As prime movers go, gas turbines are virtually brand new, compared to, say, wind and water turbines which have been around for millennia. But they have also reached a considerable level of maturity. Gas turbines now dominate both the world’s aircraft propulsion and a good portion of electric power generation. The fortunes of the industry are not uniform, however. The commercial jet engine market is robust and growing; the military jet engine, electric power, and other markets have been relatively flat or declining. But those are the sectors where the possibilities lie. They aren’t new, but they have the potential for renewal. This study delves deeper into the current status and trends in theworldwide gas turbine market.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

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