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Mechanical Engineering. 2018;140(10):30-35. doi:10.1115/1.2018-OCT1.
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For 30 years, additive manufacturing has made all sorts of promises. Yet machines remained slow, materials expensive, and printers too inconsistent for critical parts. And additive was costly. Today, however, the technology is turning that past on its head. While additive manufacturing is usually the most expensive way to make any part, it makes economic sense for supply chains. Which is why manufacturers of everything from aircraft and rolling stock to appliances, industrial equipment, and medical devices are looking at 3-D supply chain solutions—as are the U.S. Marines and UPS. This special report looks at how additive manufacturing is disrupting business models and transforming supply chains.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2018;140(10):36-41. doi:10.1115/1.2018-OCT-2.
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Researchers looking to stop a voracious predator have built a lean, mean, starfish-killing machine, an autonomous underwater robot equipped with artificial intelligence software. The robot is built by researchers at the Institute for Future Environments at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia. From early detection algorithm to the COTSBot today, which has a 99 percent accuracy rate, having done several hundred runs injecting many starfish, this article charts its development journey.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2018;140(10):42-47. doi:10.1115/1.2018-OCT-3.
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American consumers have used some variation of the basic design of the first electric vaccum launched in 1907, to sweep their carpets and hardwood floors ever since. Waves of innovation periodically swept the industry. Mass production and plastics turned this once-luxury item into a household necessity. Companies introduced accessories to clean upholstery and hard-to-reach crevices. But, by and large, it was a staid industry whose players fought for business through marketing rather than engineering. But over the past few years, an eruption of technological innovations have turned the industry on its head. This article takes a deeper dive into those technology advances.

Topics: Vacuum
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

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