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Mechanical Engineering. 2005;127(04):30-33. doi:10.1115/1.2005-APR-1.
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This article discusses about on-machine inspecting. This type of inspecting has helped to turn around business for at least one machine shop, Tech Machine in Colorado Springs, Colo., where it is made a big dent in scrap rates. Tech Machine manufactures tight-tolerance stainless steel and titanium medical parts that have many complex curves and very smooth finishes. On-machine inspecting has helped to turn around business for at least one machine shop, Tech Machine in Colorado Springs, Colo., where it is made a big dent in scrap rates. Tech Machine manufactures tight-tolerance stainless steel and titanium medical parts that have many complex curves and very smooth finishes. A part that can be measured at the machine and corrected there is one that avoids moving between the numerically controlled machine and the coordinate measuring machine. Small cuts can be made and then checked immediately.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2005;127(04):34-39. doi:10.1115/1.2005-APR-2.
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This article focuses on microelectromechanical systems that have been one of the hot topics of the engineering world for years now. Tire-pressure monitoring systems have been available on select passenger vehicles since the late 1990s. Tire-pressure sensor modules contain several components. A MEMS pressure sensor is the key element, but the package may also include a temperature sensor, voltage sensor, accelerometer, microcontroller, radio-frequency circuit, antenna, and battery. Some suppliers of MEMS tire-pressure sensors are seeking to eliminate batteries and power the tire-pressure sensing module by an alternative power source. In the sensor module, packaging must expose the sensor to air pressure and protect the rest of the components. Freescale, for example, protects its sensor with a Teflon filter, which makes sure that only dry air can enter and pressurize the diaphragm.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2005;127(04):44-46. doi:10.1115/1.2005-APR-3.
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This article highlights the inventiveness of engineers that made the auto trade big business in the early 20th century. While lacking the fame and name recognition of others in the US automobile business around the time of World War I, Lloyd R. Smith’s contribution to the industry was major. The A.O. Smith frame plant stands as a vivid case study on the role of engineering and technical innovation in the emergence and growth of the automobile industry. At the start of the 20th century, the gasoline engine initially competed for popularity with the electric motor, which was used on French and English roads. The electric motor was cleaner and easier to shift. It was considered more reliable and safer. The story of the automobile is told around images and symbols of speed and power, beauty and elegance, freedom and open roads. For ASME and the mechanical engineering community, the automobile is also about technological progress and engineering achievement beginning with the 20th century and building for a100 years.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

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