0

IN THIS ISSUE


Select Articles

Mechanical Engineering. 2014;136(08):32-37. doi:10.1115/1.2014-Aug-1.
FREE TO VIEW

This article focuses on the nanotechnology-related research work at Georgina Institute of Technology. The Georgia Institute of Technology’s Multiscale Systems Engineering Research Group is working to integrate the modeling and simulation features of today’s computer-aided design (CAD) with materials design capability. These integrated features would be available at the nano, meso, micro, and macro scales, which is called multiscale CAD. In future CAD systems, engineers will be able to zoom in to specify material morphology and distributions. Offering the capability of designing materials in CAD requires the representation of many different kinds of shapes. The multiscale CAD would also allow engineers to design better functional materials, such as state-change materials. The geometric modeling of microstructures that make up material is still in its infancy. The efficiency and controllability of complex and porous shapes are the most important research topics for the interactive modeling and design of microstructures.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2014;136(08):39-43. doi:10.1115/1.2014-Aug-2.
FREE TO VIEW

The article presents an overview of nanotechnology innovations and applications through an interview. Due to basic mechanical scaling laws, nanoscale machines can operate at high frequencies, and nanoscale production systems will be able to process many times their own mass in a short time. Thermal fluctuations are a special concern at the nanoscale; however, they’re statistically predicable and are part of standard dynamic models. In current times, however, the modeling software used to describe and test atomically precise machines machine designs comes straight out of the molecular sciences, and it doesn’t directly support abstractions at the component level. The description is very fine-grained. Mechanical engineers today can work with the existing atomistic models and can make an enormous contribution to understanding the potential of advanced nanomachinery. In these models, they can build parts and machines, and after testing in simulation, they can calculate performance parameters and then try to come up with better designs.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2014;136(08):44-49. doi:10.1115/8.2014-Aug-3.
FREE TO VIEW

This article highlights the acoustical analysis changes made by manufacturers in design cycle. Acoustical simulation is being pushed from experts to designers, following the trend for the last 15 or so years that saw other types of engineering applications like finite element analysis and computational fluid dynamics become integrated with computer-aided design packages used by mechanical engineers. With the advent of software packages that allow for design and for acoustical analysis in tandem, design engineers are increasingly running these analyses early in the development cycle and are making design changes to decrease noise and vibration issues they find. Experts suggest that with speaker sound quality and other pertinent information in hand, designers can actually design from the get-go with that information in mind, resulting in fewer design changes down the line. Though early acoustical simulation is still perhaps one of the consumer electronics’ industries best-kept secrets, that’s likely to change as word gets out about the many advantages of front-line simulation.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In