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Mechanical Engineering. 2014;136(02):36-39. doi:10.1115/1.2014-Feb-1.
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This article presents an overview of various alternative methods of nanoscale fabrication to bring revolution in the medical device development. Carbon nanotubes are considered to have great potential in biology and medicine, thanks to their desirable properties. These nanotubes are a macromolecular form of carbon; although their diameters are suitably nanoscale, ranging from 0.4 nm to 100 nm, they can be as much as several thousand nanometers long. Nanoscale fabrication can create devices that can work on individual cells and provide treatments that would be impossible if we were trying to issue them in bulk throughout the body. Nanoparticles can be fabricated using both top-down and bottom-up fabrication methods. In the top-down method, nanoparticles are carved from the bulk materials using techniques such as electron-beam lithography, reactive ion etching, and wet etching. Hybrid methods promise to integrate bottom-up and top-down nanofabrication in new and innovative ways by leveraging the strengths and unique features of both approaches.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2014;136(02):40-43. doi:10.1115/1.2014-Feb-2.
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This article discusses various aspects of a new ASME program that seeks to support a robust global supply chain for the nuclear industry. Under the program, an ASME audit team will assess a company’s quality assurance program. It will make an accurate assessment of a supplier’s capability in implementing its QA program in compliance with the NQA-1 standard and will issue a certificate affirming that the company has been found in compliance. Safeguards are in place for companies to receive a fair and unbiased evaluation. Conflicts of interest are removed by having the ASME Conformity Assessment Department develop and administer the program. The ASME audit team will visit all locations where the nuclear quality assurance program is being implemented and will require a company to implement or demonstrate all aspects of its program. The review of the supplier’s QA manual and the on-site audit will be the basis of the team’s report in conveying to ASME the company’s capabilities, knowledge, and understanding of its program and of the ASME NQA-1 standard.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2014;136(02):49-51. doi:10.1115/1.2014-Feb-3.
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This article presents technical aspects of concentrated solar power (CSP). CSP plants are seen as an attractive option to reduce pollutants and the emission of greenhouses gases not only for the United States regions of Sun Belt, but also for European Union, North Africa, and Middle East. CSP is achieving a growing penetration into global electricity markets. CSP technologies are based on the concept of concentrating solar radiation to be used for electricity generation within conventional power cycles using steam turbines. CSPs can achieve high operating temperatures of over 1000 ̊C, enabling them to produce hot air for gas turbine operation. It has long been recognized that the possibility for integration of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) is one of the key advantages of CSP over other forms of renewable energy. TES technologies are important to accelerate market penetration of CSP plants, overcoming the limitation due to the intermittence of the solar source.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2014;136(02):50-54. doi:10.1115/1.2014-Feb-4.
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This article presents an overview of the current state of dealing with jet engine bird ingestion. At Turbo Expo ‘13 in San Antonio, Dr. Aspi Wadia of GE Aviation and Dr. Lee S. Langston (author of this paper) co-chaired a three-hour panel, ‘Jet Engine Bird Ingestion – Current Issues and Ways Forward.’ The leadoff panelist was Capt. Paul Eschenfelder, a retired Delta Airlines pilot, now with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, who gave an overall review of recent bird strike accidents around the world. Panelist John Dalton, who is a Technical Fellow in Airplane Safety Engineering for Boeing, gave the airframe original equipment manufacturer (OEM) history and his views on the bird strike problem. The panel’s fourth member was Dr. Nicholas Carter who is the Director of Finance for the World Birdstrike Association (WBA). Carter explained the role of the WBA, which is the international body that represents all states and countries in issues related to bird hazards at airfields and airports.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

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