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Mechanical Engineering. 2016;138(04):32-37. doi:10.1115/1.2016-Apr-1.
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This article presents a dilemma related to increasing use of robots at work. Artificial intelligence could erase jobs or create them, but economists agree that a new generation of smart machines will alter the rules of employment. Two emerging technologies that will help robots learn even faster are cloud robotics and deep learning, an advanced type of machine learning that allows robots to learn things that humans understand tacitly. However, robots require controlled environments, while humans, who are more flexible, can cope with unstructured tasks. That same adaptability is essential for medical technicians, plumbers, electricians, and many other middle-skill jobs. The experts expect pressures on middle-skill jobs to eventually reverse because these jobs combine not only knowledge, but also adaptability, problem solving, common sense, and the ability to communicate with other people. Businesses are already pairing human flexibility with mechanical precision.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2016;138(04):38-43. doi:10.1115/1.2016-Apr-2.
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This paper describes human application of their knowledge and technological ability to fly and continue to enhance that power. Through application of their knowledge and technological ability, human beings have evolved the ability to fly and continue to enhance that power. Aircraft technology evolution is about the evolving design of the human movement on the Earth’s surface: people, goods, materials, and everything else. As the whole vehicle or animal evolves toward becoming better at moving mass on the landscape, the organs remain imperfect, because each represents a compromise. The whole vehicle or animal is a construct of organs that are ‘imperfect’ only when examined in isolation. The vehicle design evolves over time and becomes a better construct for moving the vehicle mass on the world map. Flow architectures are evolving right now, throughout nature and in technologies. The legacy of all flow systems (animate and inanimate) is: they have moved weight horizontally and improved the efficiency of that movement because of design evolution.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2016;138(04):44-49. doi:10.1115/1.2016-Apr-3.
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This article states one of the extravehicular activity (EVA) incidence that happened in NASA space station. It also highlights how NASA carefully considers checklists for the emergency repairs and EVAs. EVAs – spacewalks – are planned months, even years in advance. The astronauts who are scheduled to perform them spend hour upon hour practicing them in the controlled environment of the Johnson Space Center in Houston. Expedition 46 Commander Scott Kelly and Flight Engineer Tim Kopra successfully repaired the International Space Station's Mobile Transporter rail car during a three-hour and 16-minute spacewalk—the third for Kelly, and the second for Kopra. The smoothness of the EVA is a testimony to NASA’s ability to handle emergencies. The major lesson learned from the EVA is that a thorough worksite inspection checklist should be made to ensure crew do not leave ISS in a poor configuration after an EVA.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

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