0

IN THIS ISSUE


Select Articles

Mechanical Engineering. 2017;139(01):28-33. doi:10.1115/1.2017-Jan-1.
FREE TO VIEW

This article focuses on the need of engineers with the skills to build the Internet of Things (IoT) in the mechanical engineering industry. Many companies, especially those that cannot afford to train young employees, expect universities to do a better job in teaching mechanical engineering students practical IoT skills. Training efforts by corporations and organizations can help teach young mechanical engineers how to incorporate IoT technologies on the job. ASME hosts a series of global engineering competitions called the IShow, challenging young engineers to design a marketable product that will have a social impact. The University of Wisconsin–Madison IoT Lab is ‘a tech sandbox’ that is expected to bring together engineering and non-engineering students. Experts believe that one of the best ways to train young engineers is to have students from different majors collaborate on hands-on projects that include IoT components. A handful of university engineering departments have developed initiatives in which they are set up in partnership with government or industry, which are turning to universities to understand IoT and figure out how to take advantage of the technologies and related business and marketing strategies.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2017;139(01):34-39. doi:10.1115/1.2017-Jan-2.
FREE TO VIEW

This article discusses various challenges faced by the utilities industry in retaining knowledge and important institutional awareness as trained engineers are closing their retirement age. Utilities need to find a way to hold onto critical knowledge and important institutional awareness of these long-time employees while letting go of the obsolete information that they also hold. However, through various technological innovations, the industry is trying to take full advantage of the Internet of Things (IoT) and the wired and wireless world. Advanced Meter Infrastructure—the so-called Smart Grid—and the suite of devices known as the IoT will play a key role in the transition to a new workforce, and change the types of workers utilities employ. This latest technology will require new skill sets to construct, operate, maintain, and decommission. Digital technology, combined with and contained in such devices as cameras, strain gauges, accelerometers, microphones, and the like, can replace the senses of workers. Software coupled with computing power can improve the speed and accuracy of the engineering calculations or better analyze risk. Robots or unmanned vehicles can carry tools and sensors where it is dangerous or uneconomical to send workers.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Mechanical Engineering. 2017;139(01):40-45. doi:10.1115/1.2017-Jan-3.
FREE TO VIEW

This article explores various innovative ways that technology companies are working upon to deal with the large amount of heat of their big data centers. Microsoft’s research and development team is working on designing and building of an underwater data center. Researchers believe that underwater data centers might have power, construction, and performance advantages as well. Berkeley’s National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) recycles its chilled water. NERSC uses air to chill the data center and cooler-running components, such as disk drives, routers, and network servers. With the growing efficiency of data centers, better cooling might not be enough to make underwater operations worthwhile. But cooling is only one of the advantages that Microsoft sees in submerging its data centers. Submersibles also simplify deployment. Microsoft used an underwater cable connected to the electrical grid to power Leona Philpot, a submersible data center. In the future, it may reduce costs through renewable energy, combined with on-site energy storage and backup power from the grid.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In