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Digitization and MRO at ASME Turbo Expo 2018 PUBLIC ACCESS

 

[+] Author Notes
Shawn J. Gregg

GM, Propulsion Engineering, Delta Air Lines

Mechanical Engineering 140(03), S51-S56 (Mar 01, 2018) (2 pages) Paper No: ME-18-MAR7; doi: 10.1115/1.2018-MAR-7

Abstract

This article highlights the introduction of digital and maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) at ASME Turbo Expo 2018. The Digital impact begins at the OEM where analytical experiments assess the impact of geometry and boundary conditions on part life/performance. Performance characteristics taken from operational data are integrated with physical characteristics taken from the MRO environment to model and predict new part performance in existing turbomachinery and applied to the design and development of new turbomachinery. Most OEMs today offer an asset monitoring solution based on predictive analytics for their products. Operators and MROs looking for a more universal solution are reaching out to third parties or developing their own asset monitoring systems. Maintenance actions and shop findings are fed back to the asset monitoring solution to provide real time troubleshooting and repair work-scoping, saving valuable time in the operational and MRO environments.

Article

Inputs, outputs. Factors, responses. Correlations awaiting discovery. Whether applied to design, operation, or restoration such data can yield intelligence to reduce costs and increase performance in every phase of a product's lifecycle. The advent of data analytics and the concepts of digital thread and digital twin are giving Operators and Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul (MRO) providers capabilities that once resided only with Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs). The digital revolution has arrived in the MRO world and now Digital and MRO are coming to ASME Turbo Expo 2018.

Figure 1. How Digital technology leverages data to disrupt the traditional product lifecycle.

Grahic Jump LocationFigure 1. How Digital technology leverages data to disrupt the traditional product lifecycle.

OEMs, Operators, and MRO providers are all looking to capitalize on digital technologies. OEMs, owning the intellectual property for their designs, are weaving together digital threads to develop digital twins via a combination of physics-based and empirical modeling approaches. These digital twins offer Operators the ability to monitor, forecast, and optimize product performance. Data is generated throughout a product's life offering MRO providers the operational insight required to forecast restoration cost. Once in the shop, part condition is assessed and fed back to the digital twin to improve part lifing and performance modeling. The data lifecycle is now just as important as the product lifecycle.

The Digital impact begins at the OEM where analytical experiments assess the impact of geometry and boundary conditions on part life/performance. Performance characteristics taken from operational data are integrated with physical characteristics taken from the MRO environment to model and predict new part performance in existing turbomachinery and applied to the design and development of new turbomachinery.

Operational data is now incredibly valuable, but how is it obtained? As turbomachinery graduated from hydro-mechanical to digital-electronic based control philosophy, sensors became a necessity. These sensors were largely placed and monitored for control purposes with limited diagnostic intent. Today, OEMs and Operators are adding diagnostic sensors - with no intrinsic controls functions - to better model and forecast turbomachinery life and performance. As such, sensing technologies from other industries are infiltrating the power generation and aviation industries. Acoustic imaging is being used to identify issues with rotating turbomachinery components. Machine olfaction technologies are monitoring emissions and guiding smoke and fume troubleshooting. Wireless sensing technologies, with their simple and cost-effective implementations, are providing OEMs and Operators with previously inaccessible parameters on both new and legacy products. New technologies like these paired with traditional pressure and temperature sensors are providing a more complete turbomachinery picture.

The MRO environment also provides a wealth of data. The physical condition of the engine-run part is the tangible embodiment of all the part has experienced; and each part can tell its own story. The challenge has not been recognition of this data; rather, it is the data collection. Historically, collecting geometry or physical condition specific data (e.g. distress maps) was a labor intensive effort making it a challenging business case. Today, this can be accomplished with 3D scanning technologies. Paired either with design or measured-new-part geometry one can quickly determine how, and how much, a part has degraded. Part conditions combined with financial models and operational characteristics can produce trade studies that allow MRO providers to optimize maintenance costs, balancing engine run-times with part repair and replacement costs.

As Operators and MROs look to minimize maintenance costs, they are turning to data analytics to interrogate operational data and identify correlations between sensed parameters and part life and/or failure. Most OEMs today offer an asset monitoring solution based on predictive analytics for their products. Operators and MROs looking for a more universal solution are reaching out to third parties or developing their own asset monitoring systems. Maintenance actions and shop findings are fed back to the asset monitoring solution to provide real time troubleshooting and repair workscoping, saving valuable time in the operational and MRO environments. As with sensing technologies, the influence of other industries is ever-present. Data analytics methods taken from the financial industry to the medical records industry are now being applied to turbomachinery.

The technologies making all this possible are equally available to OEMs, Operators, and MRO providers. Data is the differentiator with each owning a different data stream: OEMs - design data, Operators - operational data, MRO providers - part condition data. OEMs and Operators with an MRO business have access to two of the three streams while independent MROs have only the part condition data. The challenge for unlocking Digital's full potential is accessing and aggregating all three data streams.

ASME Turbo Expo 2018 will explore the application and impact of Digital technologies across the turbomachinery industry with a special focus on MRO.

It is an exciting time as technologies historically focused on turbomachinery design and analysis as well as other industries are brought to bear in the operational and MRO environments. Listen, interact, and learn how academia and industry are researching, developing, and maturing the systems and methods today that will fully leverage Digital technologies across the turbomachinery lifecycle tomorrow.

Register Today for Turbo Expo 2018! http://www.asme.org/events/turbo-expo/register

Gas Turbine India 2017

In its fifth year, the ASME 2017 Gas Turbine India Conference succeeded in bringing together the gas turbine professionals from academia, industry, and government, including engineering students in India to the Sheraton Grand in Bangalore, India. Bengaluru is the Aerospace Capital of India with existence of important national and international gas turbine research, engineering&development organizations. The conference theme “Energy&Propulsion Technologies for a Digital Future” was chosen with an objective to provide the conference participants a glimpse of emerging digital trends in the modern gas turbine research and technology domain. Over 300 attendees from 14 countries shared knowledge, experience, and challenges in the field of turbomachinery. We would like to thank our platinum sponsors, GE and Rolls-Royce, our bronze sponsor, QUEST, and our lanyard sponsor, TURBOCAM, for supporting this conference.

We also recognize the Gas Turbine India Conference Committee for the wholehearted and selfless volunteer hours that they collectively dedicated toward the successful technical program of the conference.

ASME Gas Turbine Segment Leader for 2018

 

Grahic Jump Location 

ASME Gas Turbine Segment is pleased to announce Jaroslaw Szwedowicz, as the Segment Leader for fiscal year 2018. He is the R&D Senior Key Expert at Siemens Power and Gas and has over 25 years of industry and academic experience in lifetime methodologies, friction-&piezo-damping technology, fluid-structure interaction, acoustics, blade dynamics, testing and digitalization for GT. Jaroslaw has authored over 50 publications and holds 5 patents with over 14 patent applications. His skills and experiences have a proven track record in innovation based projects, technology roadmaps, and successfully leading international teams for various products. Jaroslaw acted as an AE in the ASME Journal of Engineering for GT&Power. Now he is an AE in IMechE Journal of Mechanical Engineering Science. He currently chairs the ASME Swiss Section and is a Reader at ZHAW as an academic part-time job.

Copyright © 2018 by ASME
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